Historic Photographs

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West Virginia

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Wheeling

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Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Wheeling Freight Station, Fourteenth & South Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV



B&W Photos

HB1263874
William E

HB1263875
William E

HB1263876
William E

HB1263877
William E

HB1263878
William E

HB1263879
William E

HB1263880
William E

HB1263881
William E

HB1263882
Head House, Side View William E

HB1263883
William E

HB1263884
William E

HB1263885
William E

HB1263886
William E

HB1263887
William E

HB1263888
William E


Data Pages


Drawings


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title


Location
Fourteenth & South Streets, Wheeling, WV

Find maps of Wheeling, WV


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER WV-3
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-10).
Building/structure dates: 1852 initial construction
Significance: Built in 1852, the Wheeling Freight Depot, and the passenger depot which once stood adjacent to it, formed the first terminus of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad on the Ohio River. Indeed, the B&O was the first railroad to reach that river and gain access to its thriving commercial traffic, thereby linking the Eastern seaboard to the entire Mississippi valley. The same engineering skill which enabled the builders of this railroad to surmount the formidable obstacles of the Allegheny Mountains is also evident in the construction of this building. The composite timber, wrought- and cast-iron trusses of the shed roof span a distance of 90 feet with amazing lightness and are one of the best remaining examples of the early use of structural iron in American architecture.

Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. INTERIOR OF SHED SHOWING TRUSS AND OTHER DETAIL
2. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974 TRUSS DETAIL, SHOWING IRON AND WOOD MEMBERS
3. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. LONG IRON TRUSS MEMBER, DETAIL
4. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. LOOKING UP AT HORIZONTAL MEMBER AND TRUSS MEMBER, RELATIONSHIPS
5. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. CAST IRON SIDE VIEW AND GENERAL STORE
6. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974 REAR VIEW OF RR COMPLEX FROM TRACKS
7. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. WALL DIRECTORY AND STAIR DETAIL TO REAR OF HEAD HOUSE.
8. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974 EXTERIOR VIEW OF SHED
9. HEAD HOUSE, SIDE VIEW William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974.
10. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. HAED ROUSE, ANGLE PORTRAIT.
11. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. READ HOUSE, FRONT-ON PORTRAIT
12. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974. DELIVERY DOORS, 12-13-13-15.
13. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974 WIEGHTS DETAIL, FOR OPERATING DELIVERY DOORS.
14. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974 JUNCTION OF TRUSSES TO TOP OF STONE COLUMN
15. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1974 HEAD HOUSE AND SHED PROTRAIT, VIEW FROM RIVER SIDE.


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