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Richmond

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Wickham-Valentine House, 1015 East Clay Street, Richmond, Independent City, VA



See 27 maps of this location


B&W Photos

HB1157941
BWPhotos 162570

HB1157942
BWPhotos 162571

HB1157943
BWPhotos 162572

HB1157944
BWPhotos 162573

HB1157945
BWPhotos 162574

HB1157946
BWPhotos 162575

HB1157947
BWPhotos 162576

HB1157948
BWPhotos 162577

HB1157949
BWPhotos 162578

HB1157950
BWPhotos 162579


Data Pages


Drawings


Item Title


Location
1015 East Clay Street, Richmond, VA

Find maps of Richmond, VA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS VA-310
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-350).
Building/structure dates: 1812 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1854 subsequent work
Building/structure dates: 1920 subsequent work
National Register Number: 69000329
Significance: The Wicham-Valentine House is one of the finest domestic expressions of early Neo-classical architecture in America. The design of the mansion, which was built in 1812 for John Wickham, was executed by Alexander Parris, a New England architect who also planned the nearby Virginia Governor's Mansion. Among the house's most notable features are the sophisticated plan and the elegant curved staircase with its delicate dogwood leaf and swag ornamentation. In 1854 the house was sold by the Wickhams, and subsequent owners completely redecorated the interior. In 1882, Mann S. Valentine purchased the house, and in 1892 left it, along with his collection of historical artifacts and an endowment, as the Valentine Museum. In the 1920's adjacent buildings were purchased for the growing museum collection, and the mansion was restored and furnished as a house museum. The Valentine Museum is currently (1985) sponsoring an intensive research program and investigation of the house's historic fabric to determine the nature of changes that have occurred to the building over its distinguished 173 year history.

Subjects
Houses


Related Names
Mills, Robert


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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