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Arrington Farm House, Route 29, north of Intersection of Route 634 & Rou, Madison, Madison County, VA



Data Pages


Drawings


Item Title


Location
north of Intersection of Route 634 & Rou, Madison, VA

Find maps of Madison, VA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS VA-1385
Building/structure dates: 1850 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1880 subsequent work
This documentation was completed for a class at the University of Virginia & subsequently donated to the HABS collection.

Significance: The clapboard building consists of a two-story nearly square mass with a gable roof and a one-story, two room addition with a low-pitched gable roof appended to the south and east side of the main block. Both sections are covered with green standing seam metal roofs that are pierced by stovepipe chimneys; one through the west gable of the main block and the other in the southeast corner of the addition. The clapboard on the main section to the west is secured by square-headed cut nails and runs from the sill to the roofline where it meets with a wide face board, topped by a small ovolo molding. The walls of the addition section to the east are secured with circular-headed (possibly wire) nails and meet the roof at overhanging eaves. The entire house rests on a series of rocks that serve as the foundation for its frame. At the northeast corner of the building clapboards at the sill have fallen away to reveal uniform size studs nailed to the sill with a corner brace. Further damage at the sill level indicates that the framing of the west section of the house consists of studs and posts of different sizes. Posts at the corners and window and door frames are secured in the sill by mortise and tenon joints with the studs between them simply nailed to the sill. Nail heads on the clapboard follow a corner brace on the south side of the west wall. Cracks inside the house show an additional corner brace on the north side of the partition wall between the two sections of the house. No evidence suggests any other braces in the framing.

Subjects
Building Deterioration
Farmhouses
Domestic Life


Related Names
McMahon, Heather, Historian
Sidebottom, Richard, Historian


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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