Historic Photographs

Home

Search

Subject Browse
Browse by Subject >>

State/City Browse
Alaska
Alabama
Arkansas
Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
District of Columbia
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Iowa
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Maryland
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Mississippi
Montana
North Carolina
North Dakota
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
Nevada
New York
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Vermont
Washington
Wisconsin
West Virginia
Wyoming

Home

>

Virginia

>

Between Black & Averill Avenues

>

Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Barracks O, Between Black & Averill Avenues, Hampton, VA



B&W Photos

HB1191842
BWPhotos 368996

HB1191843
BWPhotos 368997

HB1191844
BWPhotos 368998

HB1191845
BWPhotos 368999

HB1191846
BWPhotos 369000

HB1191847
BWPhotos 369001

HB1191848
BWPhotos 369002

HB1191849
BWPhotos 369003

HB1191850
BWPhotos 369004

HB1191851
BWPhotos 369005

HB1191852
BWPhotos 369006

HB1191853
BWPhotos 369007

HB1191854
BWPhotos 369008

HB1191855
BWPhotos 369009

HB1191856
BWPhotos 369010


Data Pages


Item Title


Location
Barracks O, Between Black & Averill Avenues, VA

Find maps of Between Black & Averill Avenues, VA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS VA-1210-C
Significance: Building 67 was built in 1910 as the east structure of a pair of mirror-image barracks: Barracks O (Building 67) and Barracks G (Building 66). Both structures were built during the a 1906-12 modernization of the Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (NHDVS) -- later renamed the Hampton Veterans Administration Medical Center. The Southern Branch Home, founded in 1870, was the fourth in a series of eleven branches designed to serve the disabled veteran of the Civil War. It was made possible by Congressional legislation passed in 1865, which established regional-based soldiers' homes. The Southern Branch Home represents the first soldiers' home to be built specifically to care for this nation's African-American veterans. Building 67 (and its twin) were designed by noted Portland, Maine architect John Calvin Stevens and were two of eight barracks he designed for the campus modernization. The entire set of barracks were built in three stages: Buildings 69, 70, and 71 in 1908, Buildings 66 and 67 in 1910, and Buildings 43, 50, and 52 in 1912. The buildings within each of the sets are identical, while comparisons between the sets show slight variations in architectural execution (rather than in floor plan). Building 67 represents the expansion and orderly growth of the Southern Branch due to new Home admission policies. The barracks were the first grouping of non-wood barracks at the Home. The use of brick was intended to prevent the spread of fire. The barracks were well-lighted from natural illumination through long windows, and had porches and cross breezes for good ventilation. On the interior, glazed wall tires were used to promote easy cleaning. The barracks were military in feel, but were designed in the regional vernacular, the Colonial Revival.

Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents


Back to Between Black & Averill Avenues, Virginia