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Dugway

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Dugway Proving Ground, German-Japanese Village, German Village, South of Stark Road, in WWII Incendiary Test Area, Dugway, Tooele County, UT



B&W Photos

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Data Pages


Drawings


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title


Location
in WWII Incendiary Test Area, Dugway, UT

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Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER UT-92-A
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N677).
Building/structure dates: 1943 initial construction
Significance: The Dugway German Village was the primary American site for testing incendiary bombs prior to large-scale attacks near the end of World War II against civilian targets such as Dresden, Germany. The extant structure paralleled that of an adjacent, but no longer extant, Japanese Village, used to test incendiaries for the Pacific theater. The buildings in the German Village were constructed of materials and designs that replicated contemporary residential buildings in German urban industrial districts. In order to build a facility that was an authentic reproduction, studies were conducted to determine which materials and furnishings available in the U.S. would closely match those in use in Germany. A group of German-American architects affiliated with the "Gropius group at Harvard," including prominent Jewish architects Eric Mendelsohn and Konrad Wachsmann, were employed to design the facility. Both men had been associated with the prominent architectural group, der Berliner Zehner-Ring [the Berlin Circle of 10, or the Ring] while living in Europe. The Ring included among its members Walter Gropius and Mies van der Rohe. The AN-M50 model of incendiary bomb, extensively tested at the German Village, accounted for more than 97 percent (by number) of the incendiary bombs dropped on Germany by American forces.

Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. OVERALL VIEW OF GERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING SOUTH.
2. OVERALL VIEW OF GERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD BUILDING T-8100. BUNKER, BUILDING T-8104, IN FOREGROUND.
4. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF GERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING SOUTHEAST.
5. OBLIQUE VIEW OFGERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING SOUTH.
6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF GERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING WEST.
7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF GERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING EAST.
8. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST END OF GERMAN VILLAGE LOOKING NORTHEAST.
9. DETAIL OF BRICKWORK ON SOUTHEAST SIDE OF GERMAN VILLAGE.
10. INTERIOR VIEW OF SECOND FLOOR ROOM LOOKING EAST.
11. INTERIOR VIEW OF DOORS OPENING INTO NORTH STAIRWELL, LOOKING WEST.
12. INTERIOR VIEW OF ROOF FRAMING IN ATTIC, LOOKING SOUTH.
13. INTERIOR VIEW OF ROOF FRAMING AND DORMER OPENING IN ATTIC, LOOKING EAST.
14. INTERIOR VIEW OF NEWEL POST AT SOUTH STAIRWELL, LOOKING NORTH.


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