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Othniel Beale House, 99-101 East Bay Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC



See 13 maps of this location


Item Title
Othniel Beale House, 99-101 East Bay Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

Location
99-101 East Bay Street, Charleston, SC

Find maps of Charleston, SC


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS SC-874
Building/structure dates: 1740 initial construction
0.2007
Significance: The Othniel Beale House was constructed around 1740 by Colonel Othniel Beale, a Charleston wharf owner originally from Marblehead, MA. The house is part of Charleston's fame "Rainbow Row," and was built with two adjoining tenements on land across from Beale's wharf. The largest of the three residences, 99-101, was his family home while the other two were designed as rentals. Number 97 shares the tiled gabled roof, with an egg and dart cornice, and the continuous stucco facade. The ground floor of the Beale House is divided by a central arched passage that creates two commercial spaces, and leads to buildings at the rear and the back alley. The Beale House was the first residence on Rainbow Row to be rescued from the delapidation that had permeated the neighborhood by the 1930s. Judge and Mrs. Lionel Legge along with Susan Pringle Frost, a celebrated figure among Charleston preservationists, are credited with the rejuvenation of this well-known Charleston block. The Lionels restored the early 18th century windows and replaced the original storefronts with the current cargo style doors. The iron balcony was salvaged from the now demolished C.F. Prigge House, at one time located on Elizabeth Street and the initials "CP" are clearly visible in the balcony's detailing. The original cypress paneling remains in both the parlors, a rare remnant from early Georgian Charleston. In the 20th century the garden was the location for many preservation events including the first of Charleston's legendary garden tours. Landscape architects studied the garden in the early 1990s and through archeology and research, restored the garden as Charleston's first example of landscape preservation.

Subjects
Georgian Architectural Elements
Stucco
Storefronts


Related Names
Beale, Othniel
Frost, Susan Pringle
Legge, Judge. Lionel
Destafano, Jaime, Field Team
Feaster, Sandi, Field Team
Ford, Natalie, Field Team
Grismore, Jason, Field Team
Hamilton, Will, Field Team
Joseph, Katie, Field Team
Moore, Helen, Field Team
Norton, Kim, Field Team
Peltola, Xana, Field Team


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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