Historic Photographs

Home

Search

Subject Browse
Browse by Subject >>

State/City Browse
Alaska
Alabama
Arkansas
Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
District of Columbia
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Iowa
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Maryland
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Mississippi
Montana
North Carolina
North Dakota
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
Nevada
New York
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Vermont
Washington
Wisconsin
West Virginia
Wyoming

Home

>

Pennsylvania

>

Ithan

>

Radnor Friends Meeting House, Southwest corner of Sproul & Conestoga Roads, Ithan, Delaware County, PA



B&W Photos

HB1010451
BWPhotos 213045

HB1010452
BWPhotos 213046

HB1010453
BWPhotos 213047

HB1010454
BWPhotos 213048

HB1010455
BWPhotos 213049

HB1010456
BWPhotos 213050

HB1010457
BWPhotos 213051

HB1010458
BWPhotos 213052

HB1010459
BWPhotos 213053

HB1010460
BWPhotos 213054

HB1010461
BWPhotos 213055

HB1010462
BWPhotos 213056

HB1010463
BWPhotos 213057

HB1010464
BWPhotos 213058

HB1010465
BWPhotos 213059

HB1010466
BWPhotos 213060

HB1010467
BWPhotos 213061

HB1010468
BWPhotos 213062

HB1010469
BWPhotos 213063

HB1010470
BWPhotos 213064


Data Pages


Drawings


Color Transparencies

Image not currently available to download
Please email us to
purchase this image.
Image not currently available to download
Please email us to
purchase this image.
Item Title


Location
Southwest corner of Sproul & Conestoga Roads, Ithan, PA

Find maps of Ithan, PA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS PA-6226
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N820).
Building/structure dates: 1718 initial construction
Significance: Constructed largely in 1718, Radnor is one of the oldest standing meeting houses in the Delaware Valley. Its form captures patterns of American Friends Meeting House development that are extant in perhaps no other structure. As was typical of many of the meeting houses of the early settlement period, Radnor began as a single-celled structure. The eastern addition to the main building of a supplemental room is reflective of the early attempts by the Society of Friends in America to develop a building form that best facilitated their unique form of worship and separate men's and women's business meetings. Motivated principally by the Friends regard for the status of women within the meeting, Radnor's telescoping form also constitutes the beginning of the evolution to the symmetrical, two-cell doubled type that became the standard for Friends Meeting House design by the late-eighteenth century. The builders of Radnor Meeting House were among the first generation of Quaker converts. Like other Welsh settlers to this area, they hoped to establish their own barony within the newly formed Pennsylvania Colony. Radnor Friends established a meeting for worship here in 1683. Elements of the meeting house they built, such as its steeply pitched roof, are indicative of the Medieval English building traditions that the Welsh Friends brought with them from their homeland.

Subjects
Religious Services
Stone Buildings
Friends Meeting Houses


Related Names
Lavoie, Catherine C., Historian
Boucher, Jack E., Photographer
Miller, Roger S., Delineator
Lam, Kevin, Delineator
Howell, Pamela, Delineator
Barnard, Christy, Delineator
Maksay, Adam, Delineator


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents


Back to Ithan, Pennsylvania