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Oregon

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Oakridge

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Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 22, Milepost 581.85, Oakridge, Lane County, OR



B&W Photos

HB1002299
West Portal Of Tunnel 22, Contextual View To The Northwest, 135mm Lens

HB1002300
West Portal Of Tunnel 22, View To The Northwest, 135mm Lens

HB1002301
East Portal Of Tunnel 22, Contextual View To The Southeast, 135mm Lens.

HB1002302
East Portal Of Tunnel 22, View To Southeast, 135mm Lens With Electronic Flash Fill.

HB1002303
Detail, Date Stone In Belt Course Above Keystone, East Portal Of Tunnel 22, View To Southeast, 380mm Lens With Electronic Flash Fill.


Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title


Location
Milepost 581.85, Oakridge, OR

Find maps of Oakridge, OR


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER OR-94
Significance: The Southern Pacific Railroad Cascade Route, built as the Natron Cutoff between Black Butte, California and Natron, Oregon was one of a series of major rebuildings and realignments of the original Central Pacific Railroad. Begun in 1905 under railroad magnate E.H. Harriman to replace the original Central Pacific route over the Siskiyou Mountains into Oregon, the Natron Cutoff had to overcome both natural and political obstacles. Stalled by government anti-trust lawsuits against Harriman, by World War I and the ensuing federal takeover of the nation's railroads, the Natron Cutoff finally overcame the rugged Cascade Mountains of Oregon to reach completion in 1927, at an ultimate cost of nearly $40 million. For the purpose of the current project, the Natron Cutoff was found likely to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places at the state level of significance under Criterion A for its significance in engineering, transportation history, and the economic history of central Oregon, and in the development of the West, and under criterion B for its association with E.H. Harriamn. The Natron Cutoff's period of significance is 1905 to 1945, from the beginning of construction in 1905, through the years of its role in the economic development of the central Oregon, to the conclusion of the railroad's achievements in World War II. Built in 1910, Tunnel 22 is a contributive element of this property.

Subjects
Railroad Tunnels


Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. West portal of Tunnel 22, contextual view to the northwest, 135mm lens. Tunnel 22 pierces a ridge separating Oakridge from Westfir.
2. West portal of Tunnel 22, view to the northwest, 135mm lens. Note the use of concrete face and wingwalls, with dressed stone voussoirs, wingwall coping, concrete parapet with stone belt course and coping, and rubble masonry slope protection flanking the portal. Built for the Oregon Eastern, this Southern Pacific Common Standard tunnel is contemporary with those built by different contractors for the California Northeastern at the south end of the Natron Cutoff (see Tunnel 17, HAER CA-218, and Tunnel 18, HAER CA-219).
3. East portal of Tunnel 22, contextual view to the southeast, 135mm lens.
4. East portal of Tunnel 22, view to southeast, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill.
5. Detail, date stone in belt course above keystone, east portal of Tunnel 22, view to southeast, 380mm lens with electronic flash fill.


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