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Center Street Swing Bridge, Southwest of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH



See 40 maps of this location


B&W Photos

HB946429
View Of Center Street Swing Bridge Looking North

HB946430
General View Of Bridge Looking Northeast

HB946431
This Series Of Photographs (3 Through 9) Illustrates The Operation Of The Swing Bridge

HB946432
View Showing Detail Of Truss Tower

HB946433
Pneumatic Jack And Rollers

HB946434
View Of Truss Tower And Pivot Pier Locking East

HB946435
General View Of Pivot Pier And Turntable

HB946436

HB946437

HB946438

HB946439

HB946440

HB946441

HB946442

HB946443

HB946444

HB946445

HB946446

HB946447

HB946448

HB946449

HB946450


Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages


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Item Title


Location
Southwest of Public Square, Cleveland, OH

Find maps of Cleveland, OH


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER OH-10
Significance: The bridge is the last remaining swing bridge in Cleveland. The bridge is a rim-bearing bobtail through Pratt truss. It was fabricated and erected by the nationally-famous King Bridge Company of Cleveland.

Subjects
Vehicular Bridges


Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. View of Center Street Swing Bridge looking north. the old Superior Viaduct can be seen in the background.
2. General view of bridge looking northeast. The photo is framed by the superstructure of the Detroit Superior High Level Bridge (1914-17). The open stringer construction of the lower deck of the steel arch is clearly illustrated.
3. This series of photographs (3 through 9) illustrates the operation of the swing bridge. In #3 the bridge is in its closed position. #3 4,5,&6 the boat whistles and requests passage. the bridge is closed to traffice. The bridge operator, stationed in the center of the tenders house at the center of the truss releases the pneumatic jack. The rollers beneath the deck. swing upward and the electric-powered turntable swings the bobtail drawn in the direction of the oncoming vessel. In #7 a tugboat enters the channel. In #8 a much-lightened ore carrier which has delivered its cargo to the steel mills upriver(note the high water mark), makes its way down-river towards Lake Erie. Such boats are too large to turn around on the narrow Cuyahoga, so they ...
11. View showing detail of truss tower. The vertical, or compression, members of the bridge are formed from two channel beams riveted together with lacing bars. The diagonal or tension members, are die-forged eyebars.
12. Pneumatic jack and rollers. To lift the ends of the draw span to its proper closed position, the Center Street Bridge features a pair of rollers located under the deck of each end of the draw span. The rollers are moved downward by the pistons of a pneumatic jack to support the bridge when closed. To open the draw, the rollers are released and swung upward toward the center of the deck.
13. View of Truss tower and pivot pier locking east. When the draw is open, the two arms of the truss act as cantilevers supported by the truss tower. A counterwight in the shorter of the bridge keeps the span in proper balance.
14. General view of pivot pier and turntable. The octagonal pier, 36 feet in diameter, is capped by a circular girder and a turntable that swings the bridge. the bridge was originally powered by two 25 h.p. motors coupled to two drive shafts. the turntable in the photograph is a replacement fabricated by the Allis-Chalmers Company in the 1950s.
OBLIQUE VIEW


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