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New York State Pavilion, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens borough, New York, New York County, NY



Item Title
New York State Pavilion, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens borough, New York, New York County, NY

Location
Queens borough, New York, NY

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Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER NY-333
Building/structure dates: 1962 initial construction
Significance: Although originally designed to be temporary, the New York State Pavilion has made significant contributions to twentieth century social, architectural and technological history. One of the few remaining structures from the 1964-65 World's Fair, the pavilion reminds visitors of the optimism and post-war progress that the fair aimed to flaunt. The 1964-65 World's Fair is said to represent the largest concentration of Googie architecture in one place. The fair marked the end of the Googie era, after which the style quickly went out of fashion. Philip Johnson, the well-known twentieth century architect, is credited with the design of the New York State Pavilion, which earned significant praise from architectural critics and was popular with visitors at the fair. The Pavilion had the largest suspended roof in the world, and the largest scaled road map in the world. Structural engineer Lev Zetlin developed a new configuration for the cable roof of the pavilion. In cross-section, the shape was inverted to be read as concave, rather than convex as was popular in preceding designs. As such, it represents the first of its type to be designed and constructed as a concave form in the world.

Subjects
Recreation
Pavilions
Adaptive Reuse


Related Names
Johnson, Philip
Zetlin, Lev
Brooklyn Ash Removal Company
New York City Department Of Parks And Recreation
Moses, Robert
Rockefeller, Gov. Nelson
Singh, Susan, Historian


Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

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