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Home > New Mexico > Dulce vicinity > Frances Canyon Pueblito, Frances Canyon Rincon, Dulce, Rio Arriba County, NM



B&W Photos
BWPhotos 381149
HB850783
BWPhotos 381149
BWPhotos 381150
HB850784
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HB850791
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HB850792
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HB850793
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HB850796
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Drawings


Item Title


Location
Frances Canyon Rincon, Dulce vicinity, NM

Find maps of Dulce, NM


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS NM-155
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N559).
Building/structure dates: 1720 initial construction
Significance: Frances Canyon Pueblito, one of the largest and best preserved Navajo pueblitos, was occupied after the Pueblo Revolt in 1680. This revolt broke the Spanish hold on Pueblo villages along the Northern Rio Grande. When the Spanish regained control in 1692, many Pueblo groups fled westward to seek refuge with the Navajo. This period is called the Gobernador Phase by archeologists. Excavations at Frances uncovered copper bells, European trade beads, a bone whistle, Spanish tack ornaments, a metal cross, and weaving tools. The structure originally contained twenty-three ground-floor rooms. Structural features include viga and latilla roofs, loopholes, loom fittings, peg holes, plastered walls, and hooded fireplaces. The structure's tower sits on the sandstone edge of a mesa overlooking Frances Creek tributary. The Pueblito's defensive nature is demonstrated in its location along a mesa edge. In the tower's small downward-slanted openings for lookouts, and in a first-floor defensively placed trap doorway. This doorway made unwanted entry to the upper rooms impossible. Tree-ring dates suggest the site was occupied in the latter half of the Gobernador phase, probably between A.D. 1720 and 1750.

Subjects
Archaeology
Indians Of North America
Ruins


Related Names
Navajo Indians
Pueblo Indians
Fosberg, Stephen, Field Team
Jacobson, Louann, Field Team
Botsford, Manton, Field Team
Thallheimer, Arnold, Photographer
Goodard, Roger R., Delineator
Miller, Evan E., Delineator
Shaw, Rodney B., Delineator
Metzinger, Mira D., Delineator


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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