Historic Photographs

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Montana

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Granite

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Miners Union Hall, Main Street, Granite, Granite County, MT



See 16 maps of this location


B&W Photos

HB743113

HB743114

HB743115

HB743116

HB743117

HB743118

HB743119

HB743120

HB743121

HB743122

HB743123

HB743124


Data Pages


Drawings


Item Title


Location
Main Street, Granite, MT

Find maps of Granite, MT


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS MT-15
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-15).
Building/structure dates: 1890 initial construction
Significance: The Granite Townsite was laid out in the summer of 1884. Known as the Silver Queen City she reached her heyday in 1889 when the production of the mines ran as high as $250,000 to $275,000 a month. Located 2,000 feet above the valley floor the town was well named for the entire Granite Mountain even lacked a fertile topsoil. Neither water wells nor graves were dug here. Burials took place in the valley four miles below the town. Water was hauled up the mountain in wooden barrels. The social center of Granite was the Miners Union Hall completed in 1890. The three story brick and stone building with its decorative front facade of wood, metal and brick housed the club and game rooms on the first floor, an auditorium and offices on the second floor and the lodge room on the third floor. Here socials, concerts, operas, theatricals and dances were held. The auditorium had an all maple "spring floor" suitable for dancing. The Silver Panic of 1893 was felt in Granite on August 1, 1893. Some 3,000 inhabitants left Granite in a 24 hour period. Now a ghost town, Granite experienced being reborn several times. Money invested in Granite came from St. Louis and that city is indebted to Granite Mountain and bi-metallic silver. The proceeds of these mines laid the foundation for St. Louis' first major real estate boom.

Subjects
"Mission 66" Program
Recreation
Brick Buildings


Related Names
Oyama, Jack, Field Team
Shanahan, Dick, Field Team
Blackburn, U. James, Delineator
Sobek, Durward K., Delineator
Goldy, Charles B., Delineator


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 WEST ELEVATION
2. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 WEST ELEVATION
3. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 NORTH ELEVATION (Front)
4. Historic American Buildings Survey The Historical Society of Montana, Early Photo Copy NORTH ELEVATION (Front)
5. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 FIRST FLOOR COLUMNETTES and METAL TRIM
6. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer August 1965 CAST IRON PILASTER DETAIL (Northwest Corner)
7. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer August 1965 CAST IRON PILASTER DETAIL
8. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer August 1965 CAST IRON COLUMNETTE DETAIL
9. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer August 1965 CAST IRON DOORSILL
10. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 AUDITORIUM - TOWARD STAGE (Second Floor)
11. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 LODGE ROOM (Third Floor)
12. Historic American Buildings Survey Al Huntsman, Photographer September 1965 SECOND FLOOR FRONT OFFICES DETAILS


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