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Michigan

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Port%2BHuron

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Fox Building, 107-111 Huron Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI



B&W Photos

HB650089
BWPhotos 339765

HB650090
BWPhotos 339766

HB650091
BWPhotos 339767

HB650092
BWPhotos 339768

HB650093
BWPhotos 339769

HB650094
BWPhotos 339770

HB650095
BWPhotos 339771

HB650096
BWPhotos 339772

HB650097
BWPhotos 339773

HB650098
BWPhotos 339774

HB650099
BWPhotos 339775

HB650100
BWPhotos 339776

HB650101
BWPhotos 339777

HB650102
BWPhotos 339778

HB650103
BWPhotos 339779

HB650104
BWPhotos 339780


Item Title
BWPhotos 339780

Location
107-111 Huron Avenue, Port%2BHuron, MI

Find maps of Port%2BHuron, MI


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS MI-391
Significance: The Fox Building is a substantial alteration of the National Bank Building, a Neo-Classical Revival style commercial building constructed on this site in 1903-1904. The original building interior was gutted and the two principal facades, on Huron Avenue and Quay Street, were removed and replaced in 1936 to create a new two-story commercial building with two retail stores on the first floor and offices on the second floor. The Fox Building exhibits a combination of two important architectural styles of the 1930s - Art Moderne and Art Deco -- applied to a commercial building. From 1936 to 1992, the building housed the third store of the Fox Jewelry Company, a jewelry store chain that began in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1917 and evolved into a mid-sized midwestern retail chain. It was the last building to occupy one of the premier corners on Port Huron's major commercial street. The architect, Charles M. Valentine of Port Huron, did some notable school designs in Detroit and in the Port Huron area and was well-known in southeastern Michigan in the 1930s.

Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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