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Glen%252525252525252525252525252BArbor

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U. S. Lighthouse Reservation, South Manitou Island, Glen Arbor, Leelanau County, MI



B&W Photos

HB646733
General View From Northwest Showing Lighthouse, Quarters, And Oil Shed


Data Pages


Drawings


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title


Location
South Manitou Island, Glen%252525252525252525252525252BArbor, MI

Find maps of Glen%252525252525252525252525252BArbor, MI


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS MI-336
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N20).
Building/structure dates: 182 initial construction
Significance: South Manitou has been the site of beacons providing safe passage to ships since 1839. The original 1839 light station was built to mark the southernmost point of the Manitou Passage of Lake Michigan, the most important route to the Straits of Mackinac. Together with the light on North Manitou Island, the two beacons guided ships through the narrow passage between the islands and the Leeleanau Peninsula of Michigan. In 1858, recognizing the need for greater safety, the U.S. Lighthouse Service erected a new lighthouse with a fourth order Fresnel lens. The two story brick residence also built at that time still stands. Shipping continued to increase in the subsequent years until eventually the range of the 1858 light was no longer adequate. Thus, in 1871 the current, taller cylindrical, masonry tower supporting a more luminous third-order Fresnel lens was built. The design of the current tower is typical of those built in scattered locations along the Great Lakes during the 19th century, thus reflecting the standardization of designs generated by the U.S. Lighthouse Board. Circa 1930, the North Manitou Lighthouse, which had supplemented the South Light, was swept off its foundations and a new light was built on a crib further out on the dangerous shoal. The "Crib Light" made the South Manitou Lighthouse obsolete because of its closer proximity to the passage. In 1958, the U.S. Coast Guard closed the light station which now serves as an interpretive site within the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTHWEST SHOWING LIGHTHOUSE, QUARTERS, AND OIL SHED


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