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Silver Spring

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National Park Seminary, Japanese Bungalow, 2801 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD



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Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title


Location
2801 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, MD

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Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS MD-1109-K
Building/structure dates: 1899 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1931 subsequent work
Significance: The Japanese bungalow is one of the oldest buildings on campus. It was begun in 1898, the first year of the Cassedys' building campaign, and completed in 1899. The clubhouse has a combination of eastern and western architectural designs. In its original incarnation, the standard bungalow design was transformed into a more exotic, oriental structure by the introduction of gracefully curved upturned eaves. Bungalows were a popular building style for middle-class suburban homes from the 1890s to 1920s. Their ubiquitous presence in American suburbia made them quintessential emblems of idyllic domestic life. It was not unusual to apply exotic motifs, like the Japanese upturned eaves, to a bungalow design. Exotic forms, in this case Asian, were intended to reflect the owner's sophistication and refinement. Asian designs were popular with Americans since the China Trade was established in the seventeenth century. The reopening of trade with Japan in the 1850s after years of isolation, the publication of Edward Morse's "Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings" in 1885, and the exhibition of Japanese houses at World Fairs, all contributed to the increased popularity of Japanese goods and designs around the turn of the twentieth century. Many wealthy Americans had Japanese rooms in their houses and less affluent ones purchased Japanese wares. One of the most common features of Japanese-inspired house designs were upturned-eaves like those on the Chiopi clubhouse. Since the eighteenth century, wealthy English and American estate owners have incorporated Asian garden follies on their grounds. The Japanese bungalow's neighbor, the Japanese pagoda, fits this prototype.

Subjects
Education
Military Hospitals
Adaptive Reuse


Related Names
Chi Omicron Pi (Chi-O-Pi) Sorority
Cassedy, John Irving A.
Ott, Cynthia, Historian
Boucher, Jack E., Photographer


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
South elevation, with scale
Perspective view looking from steps of Pagoda
North elevation, with scale
West elevation, with scale
Detail view of west side to show oriel window, looking from the south
Interior view, first floor main room; view includes fireplace
Interior view, first floor, general view to south southeast; view includes window seat
Interior view, first floor, southeast room west wall fireplace and mantel, with scale
Interior view, first floor, view to northwest room from kitchen looking south to north
Interior view, first floor, view looking from south to north to show stair, windows, northwest room
Interior view, second floor northeast room, looking from the west
Copy image of historic postcard showing the "Chiopi Clubhouse" (NPS postcard collection)
Perspective view looking from the northeast, from approximately the same vantage point as in MD-1109-K-12


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