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Labadieville vicinity

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Jean Charles Germain Bergeron House, State Highway 308 near Labadieville, Labadieville, Lafourche Parish, LA



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Data Pages


Drawings


Item Title


Location
State Highway 308 near Labadieville, Labadieville vicinity, LA

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Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS LA-1253-A
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N197).
Building/structure dates: 1815 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1835 subsequent work
Acadian-Style Cabin

0.1995
Significance: Single-room Acadian cabins were once commonplace on the Louisiana landscape. By 1990 they had almost entirely disappeared except for two restored examples which survive in open-air museums. The Bergeron House is one of the oldest surviving Acadian cabins in Louisiana. The house contains many architectural features of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries - features that no longer exits in surviving Acadian houses. Among these are hand-split and hand-beveled exterior clapboards, a Norman-style roof truss, and evidence that the salle or living room was originally heated by a mud-and-stick chimney set inside the gabled end of the house. That chimney was later replaced by the existing smaller brick chimney. The original ceiling boards were hand split and pegged or laid loose on the joists. The walls were built bousillage-entre-poteaux, or "mud between posts." In various locations wall posts contain the holes for the gaulettes (var. barreaux; var. batons), which supported the bousillage nogging and which which were removed later, but much of the original bousillage remains in place. The framing timbers are hand-hewn and hand-sawn, a few being cut on a sash saw.

Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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