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Lincoln Home Site, Shutt House, Edwards & Eighth Streets, Springfield, Sangamon County, IL



Data Pages


Drawings


Item Title


Location
Edwards & Eighth Streets, Springfield, IL

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Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS IL-1123-F
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-161).
Building/structure dates: 1836 initial construction
National Register Number: 71000076
Significance: From 1836 to 1849, the property belonged to Ninian Edwards, who resided in another part of Springfield. He was married to Mary Todd Lincoln's sister, Elizabeth Todd Edwards. On November 4, 1842, Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd were married in the Edwards' Home. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards sold their unimproved Seventh Street property to John Larrimore in 1849. During the period from 1849 to 1850, Larrimore made the first improvements to the property. In the latter year, he sold it to Mason Brayman, who made further improvements. Mason Brayman was well acquainted with Abraham Lincoln; he had rented the Lincoln home for nine months in 1847. Brayman was a member of the Springfield Bar and later pursued distinguished careers as lawyer, editor, railroader, Civil War general and Governor of Idaho territory. In 1860, the house was rented by George W. Shutt, who resided there with his family. The twenty-eight year old lawyer opposed Lincoln's campaign for the presidency in 1860; Shutt spoke at several rallies supporting democratic candidate Stephan A. Douglas...The Shutt house is a significant element in the interpretation of the historic site. It helps to illustrate the theme of political activity in the neighborhood.

Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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