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Schiller Building, 64 West Randolph Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL



See 29 maps of this location


B&W Photos

HB430508

HB430509

HB430510

HB430511

HB430512

HB430513

HB430514

HB430515


Data Pages


Drawings


Supplemental Material


Item Title


Location
64 West Randolph Street, Chicago, IL

Find maps of Chicago, IL


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS IL-1058
Building/structure dates: 1948 subsequent work
Building/structure dates: 1961 demolished
Building/structure dates: 1891 initial construction
Significance: Designed by Adler and Sullivan in 1891-92, the Schiller Building was a unique solution to the problem of placing a large theater and office building on a mid-block site. The result was the first "skyscraper" designed on a set-back principle. The plan was roughly I-shaped: a central 17-story tower with flanking nine-story wings formed the Randolph Street elevation, while behind it, a narrower 14-story wing extended back to the alley. The theater was placed in the central, windowless portion of the structure, while the offices above and on the street side enjoyed ample natural light. The soaring central tower represents the highest skyscraper created by the firm. In addition, the theater is said to have been one of the finest in Chicago, offering a completely unobstructed view of the stage and excellent acoustics. In February, 1960, the Garrick, as it was known locally, was named a Chicago Architectural Landmark. In spite of this recognition, in May 1960, the building's owners began to make plans for its demolition and eventual replacement by a parking facility. There followed a lengthy court struggle between Balaban and Katz Corporation and the City of Chicago; however, public opinion and civic pride were unable to prevent the final razing which occurred in 1961. Through the efforts of many individuals and organizations, the Schiller Building was thoroughly photographed and a salvage project was undertaken to preserve most of the florid Sullivan ornamentation which embellished the interior and exterior surfaces. The ornament was later distributed to interested museums, colleges, and universities throughout the country.

Subjects
Office Buildings
Clubhouses
Hotels


Related Names
Adler & Sullivan
Balaban & Katz Corporation
Smith, William Sooy
Probst Construction Company
Binder & Seifert Ironworks
Northwestern Terra Cotta Works
Rudd, J. William, Historian
Homolka, Larry J., Historian
Erins, Janis, Delineator
Felin, Robert E., Delineator
Hayman, Joseph, Delineator
Poggenpohl, J. Rex, Delineator
Saxon, Robert S., Delineator
Nickel, Richard, Photographer


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Nickel, Photographer, 1961 EXTERIOR TOP STORY DETAIL
2. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Nickel, Photographer, 1961 DETAIL OF ORNAMENT ON THE VAULT, INTERIOR WALL OF THE ORCHESTRA FLOOR, AND FORWARD EDGE OF THE BALCONY.
3. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Nickel, Photographer, 1961 INTERIOR DETAIL
4. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Nickel, Photographer, 1961 INTERIOR GERMAN CLUB ROOM
5. Historic American Buildings Survey Richard Nickel, Photographer, 1961 DETAIL OF STAIRWAY AND ELEVATOR CAGE
6. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH, 1897
7. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH C.1900
8. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH C.1900


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