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Shoshone

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Minidoka Relocation Center Warehouse, 111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, Lincoln County, ID



B&W Photos

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Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title
Minidoka Relocation Center Warehouse, 111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, Lincoln County, ID

Location
111 South Fir Street, Shoshone, ID

Find maps of Shoshone, ID


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS ID-131
Building/structure dates: 1942 initial construction
Significance: This warehouse was one of six hundred buildings constructed at the Minidoka Relocation Camp for the internment of people of Japanese descent after the bombing of Pearl Harbor brought the United States into World War II. Thousands of Japanese-American citizens and other Japanese people were forced to leave their homes, jobs, and towns and move to one of several hastily built centers to isolate them and prevent any potential collaboration with the enemy. The Minidoka camp included a variety of building types: residential, communal, administrative, service, and agricultural. One of several warehouses, this and most all other buildings at the camp were demolished or moved from their original locations after the war. The site was then divided into small farm parcels and distributed to war veterans. Since then, the National Park Service has acquired and designated part of the site as the Minidoka Internment National Monument. Although this warehouse was moved from the site and altered, it is an extant remnant of the camp. Its significance lies in the historical fact of the interment camps, where citizens were unjustly "convicted" without due process solely due to their race. Most Americans regard this as a shameful episode to be remembered so that it never happens again. The warehouse is significant as an instrument of this remembrance.

Subjects
Farming
War (World War II)
Moving Of Structures


Related Names
War Relocation Authority
Morrison-Knudsen Company
U.S. Bureau Of Reclamation


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
AFRD WAREHOUSE, SOUTH SIDE. FACING NORTH. METAL AWNING ALONG LENGTH OF BUILDING AND VERTICAL METAL SIDING ARE ALTERATIONS MAD BY THE AFRD.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, SOUTH SIDE DETAIL, SLIDING DOORS. FACING NORTH. COMPARE WITH FIGURES 4 AND 5 IN NARRATIVE REPORT, WHICH SHOW DIAGONAL BRACES BELOW GLAZED SECTION OF DOORS.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, WEST SIDE, FACING EAST. NOTE PLACEMENT OF METAL SIDING BETWEEN THE TWO HALVES OF THE SLIDING DOOR. ORIGINAL 8-PANE WINDOW HAS BEEN REPLACED BY A SINGLE PANE OF GLASS. CONCRETE BRICK CHIMNEY IS AT LEFT OF VIEW.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH SIDES.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, NORTH SIDE, FACING EAST.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, EAST SIDE, FACING WEST. NOTE LEAN-TO AFFIXED TO WALL AND THREE SETS OF TRIPLE-BANK WINDOWS.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, EAST SIDE DETAIL SHOWS CONNECTION OF LEAN-TO TO WALL. FACING WEST. NOTE THE PROFILE OF THE METAL AWNING ON SOUTH SIDE. ELECTRICAL CONDUIT AND OTHER SERVICES PENETRATE WALL. POLE SECURED WITH TRIANGULAR BRACES AT CORNER IS COMMUNICATION POLE.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, INTERIOR, FACING WEST. TWO ROWS OF ORIGINAL WOOD POSTS SUPPORT CEILING RAFTERS. SHEETROCK ON CEILING AND WALLS IS AN ALTERATION MADE BY THE AFRD. LOFT NEAR CENTER OF VIEW MAY HAVE BEEN PART OF THE ORIGINAL BUILDING.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, INTERIOR, FACING SOUTHEAST TOWARD SOUTHEAST CORNER. SHEET ROCK ON CEILING. RAFTERS ARE SUPPORTED BY POST.
AFRD WAREHOUSE, INTERIOR DETAIL OF RAFTER SUPPORT POST TIMBER AND METHOD OF BRACING. THE BRACES PENETRATE THE SHEET ROCK, SUGGESTING THAT THESE ARE ORIGINAL.


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