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John Thomson Mason House, 3425 Prospect Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC



See 41 maps of this location


B&W Photos

HB275560
Historic American Buildings Survey John O

HB275561
Historic American Buildings Survey John O

HB275562
Historic American Buildings Survey J

HB275563
Historic American Buildings Survey J

HB275564
Historic American Buildings Survey J


Data Pages


Drawings


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Supplemental Material


Item Title


Location
Northwest, Washington, DC

Find maps of Washington, DC


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS DC-167
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N659).
Building/structure dates: 1797 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1942 subsequent work
Significance: The grey and stately ruin which crowns the highest ridge of Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Island was once the hoe of General John Mason. Built in the last decade of the eighteenth century, this building, along with Thomas Jefferson's Virginia State Capitol, is important in that it is one of the first houses erected for other than ecclesiastical purposes to reflect the temple-structure influence. This architectural style is generally known as the Classical Revival,and it is interesting to note that this building lends further credence to the statement that our country led in the acceptance and development of the classical influence.

Subjects
L-plan Buildings
Brick Buildings
Houses


Related Names
Teakle, John
Worthington, Dr. Charles
Kearney, James
Clemons, Albert Adsit
Lewis, Lady. Norma Bowler
Pell
Peter, Walter G., Field Team
Dolinsky, Paul, Delineator
Gueco, Irwin J., Delineator
Byrdy, Edward, Delineator
Lebovich, Bill, Historian
Boucher, Jack E., Photographer
Volunteers For The Commission Of Fine Arts, Historian


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer November 17, 1936 2:40 P. M. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST (front)
4. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer November 17, 1936 2:45 P. M. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST
5. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 EXTERIOR VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST
6. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 STAIRHALL
7. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 ENTRANCE HALL LOOKING SOUTH
8. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 LIVING ROOM LOOKING NORTHWEST
9. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 MANTEL IN MASTER BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR
Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 LIVING ROOM LOOKING NORTHWEST
Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer May 1968 MANTEL IN MASTER BEDROOM, SECOND FLOOR


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