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Breiding House, 1523 Thirty-first Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC



B&W Photos

HB309037

HB309038

HB309039

HB309040

HB309041

HB309042

HB309043

HB309044


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Item Title


Location
Northwest, Washington, DC

Find maps of Washington, DC


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS DC-831
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N676).
Building/structure dates: 1885 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1899 subsequent work
Building/structure dates: 1901 subsequent work
Building/structure dates: 1974 subsequent work
Significance: The Breiding House is significant as a rare, late, well-designed, urban expression of H.H. Richardson and McKim, Mead & White's interpretation primarily from the mid-1870s to the early 1880s of their contemporary, Richard Norman Shaw's domestic architecture in England. In the three architect's works, this Shavian style was marked by the use of a variety of materials, shapes, and colors on the facade and roof, and especially in the American expression, the roof became the visually dominant element and often with the entire structure being incorporated within a single massive gable roof.

Subjects
Brick Buildings
Houses
Domestic Life


Related Names
Page, L. H.
Kenderline & Parrett
Hetem, Rob
RH Design Group
Simpson, Henry
Benton, David A., Delineator
Albert, Klara L., Delineator
Miller, Roger S., Delineator
Lebovich, William, Historian
Boucher, Jack E., Photographer


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

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