Historic Photographs

Home

Search

Subject Browse
Browse by Subject >>

State/City Browse
Alaska
Alabama
Arkansas
Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
District of Columbia
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Iowa
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Maryland
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Mississippi
Montana
North Carolina
North Dakota
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
Nevada
New York
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Vermont
Washington
Wisconsin
West Virginia
Wyoming


Home

>

Connecticut

>

Waterbury

>

Whittemore Building, 214-219 Bank Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT



B&W Photos

HB258996

HB258997

HB258998

HB258999

HB259000

HB259001


Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title


Location
214-219 Bank Street, Waterbury, CT

Find maps of Waterbury, CT


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS CT-409
Building/structure dates: 1904 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1950 subsequent work
Significance: The Whittemore Building, which owes its name to a leading Naugatuck Valley industrialist - John Howard Whittemore, was built on the south-west corner of land which he bought in 1901 and developed into a single commercial property called the Pritchard Block (199-219 Bank Street). Whittemore was president of the Naugatuck Malleable Iron Company, a director and vice president of the Colonial Trust Company of Waterbury, as well as a major real estate investor and developer in Waterbury and other sections of New England, Chicago, Cleveland, and the west. Built as an infill between two elaborate yet notably different buildings, the more reserved Georgian Revival building was designed by Wilfred E. Griggs, a Waterbury architect who made a visible impact on the city's appearance in its turn-of-the-century expansion. The Whittemore Building is modest in comparison to Griggs' other designs, but appropriate and straightforward in relation to its neighbors. More valuable than the individual significance of the Whittemore Building is its place within Bank Street Historic District: a contiguous row of large, multi-story buildings set close to the sidewalk, highly decorative and diverse in style, yet closely related in size, scale, and materials. Together the four buildings are typical of Waterbury's commercial architecture at the turn of the century. They also represent the city's prosperity and its economic growth during that period.

Subjects
Commercial Facilities
Warehouses


Related Names
Griggs, Wilfred E.


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. VIEW SOUTHEAST, SECOND FROM LEFT
2. VIEW EAST, WEST FRONT ELEVATION
3. VIEW WEST, EAST REAR ELEVATION
4. THIRD FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING LIGHTWELLS
5. THIRD FLOOR, LOOKING NORTHWEST
6. FOURTH FLOOR, SOUTH WALL & ROOF, SHOWING LIGHTWELL, ROOF STRUCTURE DETAILS


Back to Waterbury, Connecticut