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Monterey

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Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA



B&W Photos

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Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages


Item Title
Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

Location
886 Cannery Row, Monterey, CA

Find maps of Monterey, CA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER CA-11
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-5).
Building/structure dates: 1973
Building/structure dates: 1929 subsequent work
Building/structure dates: 1941 subsequent work
Building/structure dates: 1916 initial construction
Building/structure dates: 1921 demolished
Building/structure dates: 1921 subsequent work
Significance: The Hovden Cannery was one of the oldest and largest canneries of the Pacific Sardine Fishery. Its heyday in the first half of the 20th Century marked one of the most lucrative national fisheries and an era of literary significance in the works of John Steinbeck. Its founder, Knute Hovden, was a leading innovator in canning technology.

Subjects
Food Industry
Indians Of North America
Office Buildings


Related Names
Hovden, Knute
Stanford University
Wilbur Ellis Company
Fitzgerald, Donald, Historian
Packard, Julie, Photographer
Pursell, Carroll W., Historian


Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. GENERAL VIEW, NORTH SIDE OF CANNERY Looking north along main canning area. Retorts were located under the wooden frame work on the right.
2. FIRST FLOOR PLAN, Photocopy of Drawing, Stanford University, 1972. 4' X 5' negative.
3. SECOND AND THIRD FLOOR PLANS, Photocopy of Drawing, Stanford University, 1972. 4' X 5' negative.
4. WEST SIDE OF CANNERY In addition to showing the on-going deterioration of the buildings, this view shows the variety of types of construction used as the numerous additions were being made. The wooden covered conveyor system, which transported empty cans from the can storage area to the canning floor can be seen at the base of the smoke stack to the right.
5. WEST FACADE OF CANNERY, Photocopy of Drawing, from files of Hoyden Canning Co., October 30, 1941.
6. CANNERY PILINGS Foundation of a portion of the cannery over water. Crumbling cement footings and decomposing pilings make portions of this area unsafe.
7. EXTERIOR OF WAREHOUSE Pump house is the small, two story building protruding out into the water on the right. The reduction plant is on the left, topped by a louvered ventilation tower.
8. SOUTH END OF WAREHOUSE The third floor addition (added in 1941) can be seen on the right.
9. WAREHOUSE ADDITION PLANS, Photocopy of Drawing, from files of Hovden Canning Co., ca. 1941.
10. DETAILS OF WAREHOUSE ADDITION, Photocopy of Drawing, from files of Hoyden Canning Co., ca. 1941.
11. PUMP HOUSE AND WEIGHING ROOM Fish were pumped from floating hoppers, to the pump house (on the far right). From there they were either lifted by conveyor belt to the weighing room (top center) and thence to the holding tanks, or were washed through sealers, weighed and then sluiced to holding tanks. The process used depended upon the type and size of fish. The square cement vat (center) was to be a settling tank from which fish oil, reclaimed from the reduction process, was to be pumped into the round metal tank (above the vat). This process however, was never fully utilized before the sardines ran out.
12. CONVEYOR TRACK Conveyor track which lifted fish up to the weighing room.
13. WEIGHING ROOM Fish were lifted up from tower by conveyor, controlled by buttons above the two sets of vertical electrical conduits. They entered the weighing room through the shielded window on the left (shielding missing from the window on the right), were weighed and then transported to the holding tanks.
14. RECEIVING WINDOW-WEIGHING ROOM Receiving window at the head of the conveyor belt (note wooden drum and driving chain).
15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven.
16. VIEW FROM ATOP REDWOOD HOLDING TANKS, LOOKING SOUTH Pipe at left was part of system which provided fresh sea water to the tanks, which kept the fish fresh and allowed them to be sluiced to the cutting area.
17. HOLDING TANKS AND SLUICE DOORS This picture is taken from atop the redwood holding tanks at the north end of the building, looking across at the north end of the building. Below can be seen the sluice doors through which the fish flowed to the cutting area.
18. MAIN FLOOR - HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at holding tanks against the west wall, from which sluice gates are seen protruding. Right foreground-wooden holding tanks. Note narrow wooden flumes through which fish were sluiced into holding and brining tanks.
19. MAIN CANNING AREA - VIEW TO NORTH
20. MAIN FLOOR CANNING AREA - LOOKING SOUTH Stairway to the left leads into empty can storage area from which a can conveyor track, for flat oval cans, can be seen descending at a forty-five degree angle. Cement bases in the foreground held brining tanks into which cut fish were sluiced.
21. MAIN FLOOR - SOUTH END Same view as Photo No. 20, taken closer towards the south end of the room, showing the partially collapsed wall and roof, caused by the heavy waves during the storm of 1976. A conveyor belt is seen coming up through a square hole in the floor at the left. This transported fish from holding tanks located under, and outside the building.
22. SOUTH WALL - MAIN CANNERY BUILDING View from the south end of the main floor, showing the damaged roof and wall seen in Photo No. 21.
23. FISH CONVEYOR Conveyor described in Photo No. 21. A portion of a second conveyor is seen on the left. Vertical post knocked askew and cracked cement base of the conveyor, attest to the condition of the building.
24. CANNING ROOM Looking south towards doorways entering the cafeteria, washrooms, and side entrance to the boiler room (far right). In the rafters (right center of the picture) can be seen a curving metal slide which delivered empty cans from the can storage area above.
25. CAFETERIA Note remains of tile floor in foreground. Food cooked on the stove was served to workers in the eating area to the left of the counter (off picture).
26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, second floor above canning area. The belt has been removed from the conveyor, but sections of can conveyor tracks are visible on the floor.
27. EXTERIOR - CAN CONVEYOR TRACKS On the left are the collapsing remnants of the empty can conveyor track whose terminus was in the room in Photo No. 26. Note glassless skylights and deteriorating roof.
28. EXTERIOR - CAN CONVEYOR Exterior section of empty can conveyor which transported cans from the third floor of the main warehouse (right) to the canning area.
29. EXTERIOR - CAN CONVEYOR One of three external can conveyor systems which criss-crossed the multi-leveled confusion of roof structures of the cannery complex.
30. BOILER HOUSE SKETCH PLAN, Photocopy of Drawing, from the files of Hovden Canning Co., July 16, 1930.
32. INTERIOR - BOILER HOUSE Above the two furnaces, one of the boilers can be seen to the upper left. The large pipes in the foreground are all that remain of the distribution system. Most of the pipe and tubing have been stripped from the room and sold for scrap.
33. BOILER HOUSE - FURNACE AND BOILER Close view of the Dorward Engineering Company furnace and boiler which provided steam to the cooking retorts in the adjacent room.
34. REDUCTION PLANT Furnace and boiler which provided steam heat required in converting fish, and fish offal, into meal and fish oil. Cone shaped tank at right held extracted oil.
35. REDUCTION PLANT - HOLDING TANKS View just to the right of Photo No. 34. Note holding tanks for fish awaiting reduction, and cement bases (in front of tanks) for dryers and power units (right).
36. REDUCTION PLANT - CLOSE VIEW OF FURNACE AND BOILER Reduction Plant furnace and boiler used to provide heat for drying the fish and fish offal, in their conversion to meal.
37. REDUCTION PLANT - DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased within an outer steel shell (top half missing). As fish were tumbled by the rotating screen, they were cooked and dried by live steam piped into the dryer through overhead pipes. The dryer is mounted on a slight angle, aiding the process by moving the drying fish towards the exhaust end of the dryer.
38. REDUCTION PLANT - SECOND FLOOR Note cement bases for power units and pulley drive wheels and gears in the overhead.
39. REDUCTION PLANT - THIRD FLOOR The dried fish meal was blown into the left side of the room (behind the cloth barrier). When the meal settled to the floor level, it was picked up by an Archimedes screw-shaft which carried it to the far end of the room, where it was blown through pipes (supported by a truss) across Cannery Row to the sacking and storage building.
40. TRUSS ACROSS OCEAN AVENUE, Photocopy of Drawing, from files of Hoyden Canning Co., May 29, 1929.
41. SACKING AND STORAGE BUILDING, Photocopy of Drawing, from files of Hoyden Canning Co., May 4, 1929.
42. MACHINE SHOP Machine shop area with small parts bins on the right and pipe storage racks on the left. Remains of the power drive system are suspended from the ceiling.
43. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES - FIRST FLOOR Wooden partitions were topped with glass panels. Glass block wall faces Cannery Row.
44. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES - SECOND FLOOR This room was occupied by the representatives of the California Fish and Game Commission. Fish oil storage tanks across Cannery Row are seen through the center window.
45. MAIN WAREHOUSE - BOTTOM LEVEL Looking south from the older section of the building (with wooden posts) towards the newer portion, with its cement posts. One of the two elevators to the main floor is visible on the right.
46. MAIN WAREHOUSE - SECOND LEVEL Two elevators, left and center, and stairs, all lead to the third level. The finished produce of canned fish was stored here, awaiting shipment by either truck or train.
47. MAIN WAREHOUSE - SECOND LEVEL ADDITION Second level was added in 1941. Note the variety of building materials used in the wall: cement, bricks and finally cement blocks, with wood topping the entire wall.
48. MAIN WAREHOUSE - THIRD LEVEL Elevator drive mechanism is seen to the right, while drive wheels, belt wheels and chain drives are visible in the wooden wall framing. The horizontal metal conveyor (at the top of the wall Just under the inverted 'V' brace) is part of the empty can supply system connected to the external can conveyor. See Photo No. 28.
49. BOX STAMPING MACHINE Located in room above warehouse. The power unit is missing, but the drive belt is seen hanging from the overhead. Printing plate of desired labeling would be attached to the lower half drum. Upon rotation, labeling would be transferred to a cardboard box which was being held around the upper drum.
50. CONSTRUCTION OF MAIN WAREHOUSE, Photocopy of Photograph, 1922. View from Cannery Row. Building extended up David Avenue (to the left) where it went below grade level. From the Tony Souza collection, reproduced with his permission. 4' X 5' negative.
51. CANNING OPERATIONS, Photocopy of Photograph, ca. 1930. Pre-cookers (behind canning machines) delivered open cans of partially cooked sardines to these machines, which sealed them with lids (seen stacked in several machines), then conveyed them to high pressure steam cookers. Canning machines were powered by the overhead shafts, using belt drives. Photo from the Tony Souza collection, reproduced with his permission. 4' X 5' negative.
52. EXTERIOR OF HOVDEN CANNERY ON CANNERY ROW Photos 52-55 are shot sequentially to create a panoramic view.
53. EXTERIOR VIEW OF HOYDEN CANNERY ON CANNERY ROW Photos 52-55 are shot sequentially to create a panoramic view.
54. EXTERIOR VIEW OF HOVDEN CANNERY ON CANNERY ROW Photos 52-55 are shot sequentially to create a panoramic view.
55. EXTRIOR VIEW OF HOVDEN CANNERY ALONG CANNERY ROW Photos 52-55 are shot sequentially to create a panoramic view.


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