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Los%2525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252BAngeles

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Fourth Street Viaduct, Spanning Los Angeles River, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA



B&W Photos

HB195505
BWPhotos 193923

HB195506
BWPhotos 193924

HB195507
BWPhotos 193925

HB195508
BWPhotos 193926

HB195509
BWPhotos 193927

HB195510
BWPhotos 193928

HB195511
BWPhotos 193929

HB195512
BWPhotos 193930

HB195513
BWPhotos 193931

HB195514
BWPhotos 193932

HB195515
BWPhotos 193933

HB195516
BWPhotos 193934


Drawings


Photo Caption Pages


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Item Title


Location
Spanning Los Angeles River, Los%2525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252BAngeles, CA

Find maps of Los%2525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252BAngeles, CA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1968.

Notes
Survey number HAER CA-280
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (N854).
Building/structure dates: 1931 initial construction
Significance: Fourth Street Viaduct was one of several reinforced concrete bridges providing an elegant, sturdy crossing over the Los Angeles River and railroad tracks built by the City of Los Angeles beginning the late 1920s. Providing access between Boyle Heights and the downtown core, Fourth Street Viaduct replaced two viaducts, one for automotive traffic and one for the Los Angeles Railway. By eliminating the grade crossings at Mission Road and Santa Fe Avenue, the bridge allowed for easier communication between the area bifurcated by the river and train traffic along the Union Pacific and Atkinson Topeka & Santa Fe Railway. The construction of the 254-foot river span was aided by the use of temporary reinforced concrete hinges during its construction. The design of the bridge incorporated ornamental elements such as precast railings and cast aluminum lanterns.

Related Names
Butler, Merrill
Winter, H. H.
Jessup, J. J.
Cortelyou, H. P.
Calhoun, Chad
Fisher, Ross, Macdonald & Kahn, Inc.
Ammer, Erin, Field Team
Currie, Jason, Field Team
Day, Grant, Field Team
Greenwood, David, Field Team
Larson, Heather, Field Team
Watson, Elizabeth, Historian
Grogan, Brian, Photographer


Collection
Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress)

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