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Los%252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252BAngeles

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Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA



Data Pages


Item Title


Location
800 North Alameda Street, Los%252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252BAngeles, CA

Find maps of Los%252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252525252BAngeles, CA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS CA-2158
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-177).
Significance: Believed to be the last monumental railroad station built in America. It is also considered the only major station built it the Spanish style in America. It was designed by two of the most important architects of the period in Los Angeles, John and Donald Parkinson. The Spanish colonial style was chosen to reflect the heritage of the area and to blend in with El Pueblo de Los Angeles, across Alameda Street. The station also deliberately took advantage of the climate by incorporating open air courtyards and extensive landscaping into the original design. There is extensive and imaginative use of Mexican style tile, both quarry and handpainted. The fixtures reflect the Art Deco influence of the period and are largely unaltered. For many years, particularly during WWII when 100 trains a day carried servicemen to and from Los Angeles the station was an important gateway to the city.

Subjects
Railroad Stations
Railroad Industry


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents


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