Historic Photographs

Home

Search

Subject Browse
Browse by Subject >>

State/City Browse
Alaska
Alabama
Arkansas
Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
District of Columbia
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Iowa
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Maryland
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Mississippi
Montana
North Carolina
North Dakota
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
Nevada
New York
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Vermont
Washington
Wisconsin
West Virginia
Wyoming

Home > California > Death Valley Junction vicinity > Death Valley Ranch, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA



B&W Photos
General View Looking East
HB128376
General View Looking East
General View From East, Main House In Foreground
HB128377
General View From East, Main House In Foreground
House And Annex Looking Southwest, Service Station To Left
HB128378
House And Annex Looking Southwest, Service Station To Left
General View Looking Northwest
HB128379
General View Looking Northwest
General View Looking North, Gravel Separator To Left, Entrance Gates In Right Foreground
HB128380
General View Looking North, Gravel Separator To Left, Entrance Gates In Right Foreground


Data Pages


Drawings


Photo Caption Pages


Color Transparencies

Image not currently available to download
Please email us to
purchase this image.
Image not currently available to download
Please email us to
purchase this image.
Image not currently available to download
Please email us to
purchase this image.
Item Title


Location
Death Valley Junction vicinity, CA

Find maps of Death Valley Junction, CA


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS CA-2257
Unprocessed field note material exists for this structure (FN-150).
Building/structure dates: 1922
Building/structure dates: 1931 subsequent work
Significance: Death Valley Ranch was built as the vacation retreat for Chicago millionaire Albert M. Johnson. Although lavishly decorated and handsomely appointed, its extremely isolated location near Death Valley is wildly eccentric and was the primary reason it attracted the degree of notoriety it has received since construction began. Construction began modestly in 1922 but expanded in increments over a ten-year period. Questions of land ownership and crippling financial difficulties halted construction in 1931, leaving many projects only partially completed. Evidence of plans unfulfilled are interspersed among the otherwise luxurious estate. The buildings, furnishings, and ornament were designed in the studio of Charles Alexander MacNeilledge. The entire complex in unified by the consistent use of a Spanish Mediterranean motif, and the recurrence of certain materials: redwood, ceramic tile, stucco finishes and hand-wrought metalwork. The furnishings establish a secondary theme -- the Desert -- by incorporating images of animals and plants associated with the local terrain into their design.

Subjects
Ranches


Related Names
Johnson, Albert Mussey
Scott, Walter
Johnson, Bessie
MacNeilledge, Charles Alexander
Kropf, F. W.
Thompson, M. Roy
Boucher, Jack, Photographer


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING EAST
2. GENERAL VIEW FROM EAST, MAIN HOUSE IN FOREGROUND
3. HOUSE AND ANNEX LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SERVICE STATION TO LEFT
4. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST
5. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, GRAVEL SEPARATOR TO LEFT, ENTRANCE GATES IN RIGHT FOREGROUND
General view looking from the southeast
General view looking from the northeast


Back to Death Valley Junction vicinity, California