Historic Photographs

Home

Search

Subject Browse
Browse by Subject >>

State/City Browse
Alaska
Alabama
Arkansas
Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
District of Columbia
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Iowa
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Maryland
Maine
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Mississippi
Montana
North Carolina
North Dakota
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
Nevada
New York
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Vermont
Washington
Wisconsin
West Virginia
Wyoming

Home

>

Alabama

>

Birmingham

>

Heaviest Corner on Earth (Commercial), First Avenue, North & Twentieth (20th) Street, Nor, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL



B&W Photos

HB42116
Aerial View, Looking South, Along 20th Street North With Empire Building (center Right), Woodward Building (center), John Hand Building (top Left), Brown Marx Building (bottom Left), The Four Buildings That Comprise This National Register Historic Distric

HB42117
Aerial View, Looking West, Along First Avenue North, With Brown Marx Building (bottom Center To Right), Empire Building (center Top) With Its Terracotta-clad 20th Street And First Avenue Facades, And John Hand Building

HB42118
Exterior/street Level View, Looking West Along First Avenue North With (left To Right) Caldwell-milner, Mcadory, John Hand, Woodward Buildings And Brown Marx Building (right)


Data Pages


Photo Caption Pages
No images were found.

Item Title


Location
Nor, Birmingham, AL

Find maps of Birmingham, AL


Created/Published
Documentation compiled after 1933.

Notes
Survey number HABS AL-927
Significance: The Heaviest Corner showcases both the Chicago and New York architectural traditions in the design of skyscrapers. Designed by important local architects in association with national firms (on three of the four buildings), the earliest buildings, the Woodward and the Brown Marx, are good examples of the Commercial style, with exteriors strongly reflecting the skeletal structure. The Woodward Building (the first steel frame building in the city) introduced the innovative technologies of the skyscraper form -- steel frame construction, terra cotta fire-proofing and decoration, internal plumbing, and the use of electricity to light and heat interior spaces -- to Birmingham. The later two Neoclassical Revival style skyscrapers, the American Traders-John Hand Building and the Empire-Colonial Bank Building, are extravagantly adorned towers decorated with granite, marble and glazed terra cotta in skilled interpretations of classical motifs.

Subjects
Commercial Facilities


Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)

Contents
Photograph caption(s): 
1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ALONG 20TH STREET NORTH WITH EMPIRE BUILDING (CENTER RIGHT), WOODWARD BUILDING (CENTER), JOHN HAND BUILDING (TOP LEFT), BROWN MARX BUILDING (BOTTOM LEFT), THE FOUR BUILDINGS THAT COMPRISE THIS NATIONAL REGISTER HISTORIC DISTRICT
2. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST, ALONG FIRST AVENUE NORTH, WITH BROWN MARX BUILDING (BOTTOM CENTER TO RIGHT), EMPIRE BUILDING (CENTER TOP) WITH ITS TERRACOTTA-CLAD 20TH STREET AND FIRST AVENUE FACADES, AND JOHN HAND BUILDING
3. EXTERIOR/STREET LEVEL VIEW, LOOKING WEST ALONG FIRST AVENUE NORTH WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) CALDWELL-MILNER, MCADORY, JOHN HAND, WOODWARD BUILDINGS AND BROWN MARX BUILDING (RIGHT). ALSO PICTURED IS THE BANK FOR SAVINGS BUILDING (TOP RIGHT) AND THE RAILROAD RESERVATION (TOP LEFT TO RIGHT). VIEW TAKEN AS CITY THAWS FROM A MARCH BLIZZARD.


Back to Birmingham, Alabama